A Story of Faithfulness – 10 Years in the Making

A Story of Faithfulness – 10 Years in the Making

Many years passed and Xiao Wei and her family returned to their rural hometown. She began to do some sewing and to grow sunflowers and fava beans on a small plot of land. Some of her friends came to visit and helped her from time to time with the farming. Life became more difficult. She broke her leg while trying to harvest sunflowers. Her crippled daughter died of pneumonia a few months later.

Intentionality with a Dongxiang Friend

Intentionality with a Dongxiang Friend

The Gospel clearly speaks for itself. But honestly, it can be hard to find different angles from which to share the Gospel when it comes to friends who have been shared with many, many times. I’m so thankful, though, that the Lord continues to open doors, windows, even cracks for His Word to come through.

Eid al-Adha – The Festival of the Sacrifice

Eid al-Adha – The Festival of the Sacrifice

Hours before sunrise Mr. Ma, his father, grandfather, and 4-year-old son, Ibrahim, all rise and get dressed. Winter has almost arrived so they pull on their warmest long underwear before slipping into their finest clothes. Mr. Ma slips on black dress pants, a new white shirt and a nice grey sports coat. His son has received new clothes for this special day. He has a new white outfit that resembles traditional Muslim clothing with a colorful prayer cap (skull cap). The Ma men leave their mud brick home and walk down to the local village mosque where they find a tour bus waiting.

Day Twenty Nine: Working with the Dongxiang

Day Twenty Nine: Working with the Dongxiang

I’ve heard before that it’s not always good to listen to what “they” say, but it can also be very difficult to get first-hand experience, especially when it comes to expat life in another country, namely China. We also often hear a friend here say, “What’s true today in China will not necessarily be true tomorrow.”

When the Father called our family to China to work among the Dongxiang people, we were about as green as you could be when it comes to working among Chinese Muslims.

“Do You Have Eggs?”

“Do You Have Eggs?”

“Do you have eggs?”

A huge warm smile spread over the man’s face that day. He wore a white crocheted hat, typical of a lot of DongXiang men in this area.

“Of course!” he answered in clear Mandarin and hurried to get a plastic bag to collect the eggs I had requested.