The Hui

The Hui, about 15 million people, are the largest and most widespread of China’s Muslim nationalities. They also comprise the third largest minority group in China. Out of 15 million Hui people, less than 1% have heard the Gospel.
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The Dongxiang

The Dongxiang people, with a population of 621,500, are the fourth largest of China’s 10 Muslim people groups. The largest concentration of the Dongxiang people is in the rugged, dry mountains of Gansu Province. Most are isolated from the outside world with few if any opportunities to hear the Gospel.
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The Salar

The Salar people migrated from the Samarkand region of Central Asia many centuries ago. According to oral tradition their forefathers bound a copy of the Koran to the head of a camel and followed it until it stopped at a waterfall and turned to stone in their present home of Qinghai province in Northwest China. Today two-thirds of the 120,000 Salar people still live in this small area of Xunhua County, Qinghai province.
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The Huihui

The Huihui are a small unreached people group of about 10,000 people found in Sanya on Hainan Island. The Huihui identify themselves as part of the Hui minority group in China. However, they realize they are different. They have slightly different facial features and skin color and look more Malaysian than Chinese. In fact, they trace their ancestry back to Malaysia, Cambodia and/or Vietnam.
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This is the word of the LORD to Zerubbabel: “Not by might, nor by power, but by my Spirit, says the LORD of hosts.”

Zechariah 4:6

Intentionality with a Dongxiang Friend

The Gospel clearly speaks for itself. But honestly, it can be hard to find different angles from which to share the Gospel when it comes to friends who have been shared with many, many times. I’m so thankful, though, that the Lord continues to open doors, windows, even cracks for His Word to come through.

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A Call to Prayer

I had never seen Friday prayers at a mosque before. On our way back from a trip to another city, we decided to stop and watch as the men assembled for worship. It was a cold, cloudy afternoon, eerily quiet, the square almost void of people. A few minutes passed as I wandered around in front of the intricately decorated mosque, looking at the buildings and attempting but not succeeding to read the characters written on the walls. One by one, men in hats began making their way toward the mosque, passing through the arched passageway and into the courtyard. I watched the hats move toward the entrance, and sadness overcame me; it overtook my thoughts and I could think of nothing but the Lostness, so much Lostness. As more hats bobbed by, we decided to follow. Entering that place had a strange effect on me. I love history, particularly the architecture of old or ancient peoples, so it’s often the case that when I see buildings – churches, temples, mosques – from older time periods, what comes to mind first are wonderings of what they were like when they were first built. But sometimes that wonderment conflicts with sadness at what some of these buildings represent. In this particular mosque, I did notice the colors, the ridged eaves, the curved roofs, the carvings, etc., but seeing those men file in before had made my heart ache. As I slowly wandered, the amount of hats increased and the pairs of shoes removed and placed neatly outside the prayer hall grew – shoes on the ground, against walls, one pair... read more

Who is Who?

Buddhist jewelry, short-shorts and neighborhood bars. These are typically not the first things that pop into one’s mind when thinking of Muslims. I live in a city with mostly Han people and roughly thirty percent Hui people. Despite the people group categorization, at first glance it can be difficult to differentiate the Hui from their Han neighbors. Traditionally, the Hui people have a distinct culture that can be characterized from the outside by their clothing and lifestyle choices. However, cultural lines between the Han and the Hui are becoming more and more blurred.

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What’s in a Story?

Storytelling has been around for generations uncountable. It spans countries, cultures, and people groups. It’s a major component in the lives of people from oral cultures, and it sneaks its way into the everyday lives of people from written cultures as well.

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May God be gracious to us and bless us and make his face to shine upon us, that your way may be known on earth, your saving power among all nations.

Psalm 67:1-2

God is at work among the Hui!

This site is a reminder that the mission is not dependent on us but on the Spirit. Our desire is to promote prayer for the Hui and to encourage individuals and churches to consider how they can engage the Hui.

Pray

Join us by committing to pray for the Hui. Check out the resources that are available to guide your prayers.
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Engage

Join us and engage the Hui by adopting a population segment and partnering to proclaim the Gospel!
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Then he said to his disciples, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few; therefore pray earnestly to the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest.”

Matthew 9:37-38

RESOURCES

Finally, brothers, pray for us, that the word of the Lord may speed ahead and be honored, as happened among you…

2 Thessalonians 3:1

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